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The gods are in the betting shops
the gods are in the caff
the gods are smoking fags out the back
the gods are in the office blocks
the gods are at their desks
the gods are sick of always giving more and getting less
the gods are at the rave –
two pills deep into dancing –
the gods are in the alleyway laughing
the gods are at the doctor’s
they need a little something for the stress
the gods are in the toilets having unprotected sex
the gods are in the supermarket
the gods are walking home,
the gods can’t stop checking Facebook on their phones
the gods are in a traffic jam
the gods are on the train
the gods are watching adverts
the gods are not to blame –
they are working for the council
now they’re on the dole
now they’re getting drunk pissing their wages down a hole
the gods are in their gardens
with their decking and their plants
the gods are in the classrooms
the poor things don’t stand a chance
they are trying to tell the truth
but the truth is hard to say
the gods are born, they live a while
and then they pass away.
Kate Tempest - Brand New Ancients
Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014]

    Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

    Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.

    Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 

    Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.

    Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

    A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 

    Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 

    [Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014]

    Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”
Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing
On that note…
Wired:

How TV series Utopia got its comic book look
Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.
In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4
Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”
The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”

      Utopia (S01): A master class in set design & colour dressing

      On that note…

      Wired:

      How TV series Utopia got its comic book look

      Sci-fi series Utopia centres around a mismatched group who discover a global conspiracy in a comic book. But are they also living in one? For beyond the Channel 4 thriller’s hyper-real violence is a use of colour unlike any other show on TV.

      In order to replicate the graphic novel’s bold aesthetic, director Marc Munden turned to the Technicolor palette of 1950s Hollywood. “Normally the way you’d colour a piece of cinematography is by constructing it with greens, blues and reds,” explains Munden, 54. “The three-strip Technicolor process we use is comprised of the opposite colours — yellows, cyan, magentas. I was interested in Doris Day films from the 1950s that pushed those distinct elements.”

      Utopia | Channel 4Channel 4

      Like comic-book artists, Munden and colourist Aidan Farrell carefully colour-correct each shot in post-production — though they use grading software Nucoda Film Master instead of a brush or pen. “It’s the equivalent of when they used to hand-paint photos in the Edwardian times,” says Munden. “So, we choose certain colours like yellow and turquoise and paint them into the shots afterwards. The skies that we shot weren’t always blue, they were mostly grey British skies. The same goes for making grass greener, eyes brighter, or turning a blue van yellow.”

      The colour palette for series two, airing Monday 14 July onwards, is even bolder — with production now aided by sets that are pre-prepared for grading. “In series one, where we were still trying to find this aesthetic, it was difficult to manipulate colours in a shot that weren’t part of the palette. This time, we can afford to dress the sets in more yellows, cyans and magentas so in post-production we can make them bolder. We had a much clearer idea of what we were looking for.” As for the central mystery itself, Munden is keeping it under wraps — although he does hint towards one mysterious episode that he’s not allowed to talk about. “It’s mad, I can tell you that.”