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Privacy, a play by James Graham @ Donmar Warehouse, London, Fri 11 April 2014

Meh. Gimmicky + audience participation (yuk) + stuff about privacy & the net that has been discussed before ad nauseam =>  I left at the interval.

… That said, when asked to take a selfie, I preferred to capture what was happening on stage — still way more interesting that my stupid mug, I’d say. 

Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar
When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).
I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.
But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 
I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).
Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 
[Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014]

    Versailles, a play directed by Peter Gill for the Donmar

    When it comes to theatre, I’m no stranger to bailing out at the interval (isn’t that what intervals are for?… to let you decide whether to go for ice cream, for a smoke, for a bathroom break, or simply to go home?)… Especially at the Donmar, under Josie Rourke’s uneven tutelage (god, that woman can do boring quite spectacularly).

    I was prepared to bail out on Versailles halfway through. Because of the topic (WWI), and the fact that it’s three hours, and the fact that the critics were not creaming themselves over it.

    But as it turned out, I loved it and found it thoroughly engaging. 

    I loved it whenever it went macro and had the main protagonists discuss at length the geopolitical impact of the Versailles treaty, and I loved whenever it went micro and focused on the personal dramas caused by the war. I was particularly intrigued and moved by Hugh Skidmore’s storyline (the surviving soldier played by Josh O’Connor).

    Fantastic acting throughout with some very poignant and emotional scenes — when Christopher Godwin (playing Arthur Chater) suddenly broke down, it grabbed my the throat and made me want to weep so loudly it was excruciating. 

    [Seen @ Donmar Warehouse, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014]

    The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014] The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade
Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014]

      The Double (2014) by Richard Ayoade

      Wow, not only was I cruelly disappointed, but worse, I was bored senseless. I thought Submarine was such a wonderful debut — Wes Anderson’s Rushmore with British flavour. This one, I don’t know…  Brazil meetsFight Club meets a multitude of others?… Whatever Ayoade’s meant to achieve with The Double, he’s clearly still trying to find his voice. I’m sure he’ll get there with the next one.

      [Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Saturday 5 April 2014]