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One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.)

    One-eyed Wilson

    So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene.

    (I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.)

    Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters.

      Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

      Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

      This film really strikes a chord with me — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.

      Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.

      Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters.

      Sun Kil Moon - Micheline

      Micheline

      Sun Kil Moon

      Benji

      Sun Kil moon - Micheline

      My friend Brett, my friend Brett, my friend Brett, my friend Brett

      No matter how often I play the song (and boy have I played it a lot these past couple of months), it never fails: every time the “grandma” lyric kicks in, I break a little. Every time. 

      Chez Alexandre et Fils, Montreal, 9 Feb 2009

      A photo I took when my back problem was at its worst. Over the course of a month my work made me fly economy to Bali, Houston, NYC and Montreal. At a time when I could barely walk and couldn’t manage the upright position. I was completely broken… How the fuck did I survive those trips, I wonder? Anyway anyway good times but what’s prompting this very lame reminiscencing of mine is re-reading stories I posted on cowbird.com a few years ago. That Montreal snapshot is still very vivid in my mind. Along with the back pain.

      Man, was I grateful to Alexandre and his sons that day. I had been limping my way through Montreal in search of a place to rest — and when I say “limping” I mean “crawling on all fours”. My sciatica was killing me and by the time I reached Alexandre’s brasserie I was bent in half, on the verge of (not-so-manly) tears.

      As soon as I got in, I knew I had stricken gold. The place was inviting, cozy and was buzzing with just enough hustle and bustle to give it a great vibe. Most of the patrons were Suits On Their Lunch Break — they all looked like they were holding on to their jobs just so they could continue to hang at Alexandre’s.

      The food was great-value-for-money — your classic no-frills brasserie fare — and the Chablis (a lot of it) made the back pain go away. I was happy.

      But what made that lunch so memorable was what was happening at the table next to mine: it was occupied by a woman and a man in their late 40s, fresh out of a board meeting I bet, both looking sleek and attractive, and they were in what looked like a serious conversation… Except they were discussing the merits of Buffy and Battlestar Galactica. That’s right. I could not believe what I was hearing. I was awestruck. At that moment I thought the Canadians were the coolest people on earth and that Montreal was the hottest place to be.

      That Montreal trip was the last straw that broke this camel’s back. I went back to London and lived completely horizontal for a couple of months until I had surgery.

      ………………………………..

      Alexandre et fils

      1454 rue Peel, 
      Montréal (Québec) H3A 1S8
      Canada 
      Tel. : (514) 288-5105

      Kate Bush - The Sensual World

      The Sensual World

      Kate Bush

      The Sensual World

      Kate Bush - The Sensual World

      He said I was a flower of the mountain, yes. 
      But now I’ve powers o’er a woman’s body, yes.

      Neil Gaiman about Kate Bush and “The Sensual World”:

      One of the things I love about Kate Bush is her absolute ability to pluck things that you would never expect to see on a Rock album and put them there, and make them work. James Joyce’s Ulysses — one of the greatest passages in all of English or Anglo-Irish literature is Molly Bloom’s glorious soliloquy ending in a sequence of yeses. It’s about embracing the world of the senses, embracing yourself, embracing sex, embracing love, embracing the future, embracing all possibility.

      And it goes all the way back from me, to “Wuthering Heights”. This is somebody who’s not afraid of books. Somebody who’s not afraid of reading. Somebody who’s not afraid of writers. Who’s not afraid of translating/being an intermediary/being a door between the world of books and the world of Rock.

      Byron once said of Keats: “Keats writes about what he imagines. I write about what I live.” Most Rock ‘n’ Roll people write about their lives in some way. Kate Bush is more like Keats in that she writes about what she imagines.
      Kate Bush by Steve Coogan