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Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
"And aside from Tsukuru Tazaki, they all had another small, coincidental point in common: their last names all contained a color. The two boys’ last names were Akamatsu  – which means ‘red pine’ – and Oumi – ‘blue sea’; the girls’ family names were Shirane – ‘white root’ – and Kurono – ‘black field.’ Tazaki was the only last name that did not have a color in its meaning. From the very beginning this fact made him feel a bit left out. Of course, whether or not you had a color as part of your name had nothing to do with your personality. Tsukuru understood this. But still, it disappointed him, and he surprised himself by feeling hurt. Soon, the other four friends began to use nicknames: the boys were called Aka (red) and Ao (blue); and the girls were Shiro (white) and Kuro (black). But he just remained Tsukuru. How great would it be, he often thought, if I had a color in my name too. Then everything would be perfect.” Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
"And aside from Tsukuru Tazaki, they all had another small, coincidental point in common: their last names all contained a color. The two boys’ last names were Akamatsu  – which means ‘red pine’ – and Oumi – ‘blue sea’; the girls’ family names were Shirane – ‘white root’ – and Kurono – ‘black field.’ Tazaki was the only last name that did not have a color in its meaning. From the very beginning this fact made him feel a bit left out. Of course, whether or not you had a color as part of your name had nothing to do with your personality. Tsukuru understood this. But still, it disappointed him, and he surprised himself by feeling hurt. Soon, the other four friends began to use nicknames: the boys were called Aka (red) and Ao (blue); and the girls were Shiro (white) and Kuro (black). But he just remained Tsukuru. How great would it be, he often thought, if I had a color in my name too. Then everything would be perfect.” Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
"And aside from Tsukuru Tazaki, they all had another small, coincidental point in common: their last names all contained a color. The two boys’ last names were Akamatsu  – which means ‘red pine’ – and Oumi – ‘blue sea’; the girls’ family names were Shirane – ‘white root’ – and Kurono – ‘black field.’ Tazaki was the only last name that did not have a color in its meaning. From the very beginning this fact made him feel a bit left out. Of course, whether or not you had a color as part of your name had nothing to do with your personality. Tsukuru understood this. But still, it disappointed him, and he surprised himself by feeling hurt. Soon, the other four friends began to use nicknames: the boys were called Aka (red) and Ao (blue); and the girls were Shiro (white) and Kuro (black). But he just remained Tsukuru. How great would it be, he often thought, if I had a color in my name too. Then everything would be perfect.”

    Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

    "And aside from Tsukuru Tazaki, they all had another small, coincidental point in common: their last names all contained a color. The two boys’ last names were Akamatsu – which means ‘red pine’ – and Oumi – ‘blue sea’; the girls’ family names were Shirane – ‘white root’ – and Kurono – ‘black field.’ Tazaki was the only last name that did not have a color in its meaning. From the very beginning this fact made him feel a bit left out. Of course, whether or not you had a color as part of your name had nothing to do with your personality. Tsukuru understood this. But still, it disappointed him, and he surprised himself by feeling hurt. Soon, the other four friends began to use nicknames: the boys were called Aka (red) and Ao (blue); and the girls were Shiro (white) and Kuro (black). But he just remained Tsukuru. How great would it be, he often thought, if I had a color in my name too. Then everything would be perfect.”

    Saturday Night Live - Beauty and the Beast

    As soon as Kristen Wiig opens her mouth to sing like a Disney retard, you know it’s going to be a funny sketch. A very funny one. 

    Beauty The Beast: “Lumiere, get in here! Who is the Beauty [pointing at herself] and who is the Beast [pointing at Gerald Butler]?”

    Lumiere: “You both look like beasts to me. Well, I’m a candelabra — I’m only attracted to other candelabras. Although once, in college, I dated a menorah.”

    One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.) One-eyed Wilson
So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene. 
(I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.)

      One-eyed Wilson

      So, I was watching Wilson Wilson (that’s right, Wilson Wilson is his name) being tortured last night. Under normal circumstances I would have been absolutely fine with it. Would have enjoyed it, even. Except for one problem: Adeel Akhtar is the spitting image of a friend of mine. And that, my fellow tumblrrrrer, changes everything: it turned that torture scene into a particularly excruciating bit to watch… Although, as painful as it was, I did screen-grab the hell out of that scene.

      (I went on Facebook to enquire about my friend’s eye.)

      Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters.

        Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

        Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

        This film really strikes a chord with me — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.

        Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.

        Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters.