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Live wind data visualised by… wind. And lights. Experience Jia Yu Liu’s spectacular installation at the RCA grad show 2014 until 29 June.

Video description: 

WITHIN INVISIBILITY| JIA YU LIU

Within Invisibility is a wind data based art project. The core concept is to skip the jargon of conventional “wind charts” or “wind speed visualisation”, and to transfer wind data into real, windy atmosphere, connecting data with multi-sensational experience. 

40 major Chinese cities’ wind data is used, and each city is represented by two fans. Data is received and analysed every 6 hours throughout the week. Rose patterns on each fan transforms every 6 second, echoing with the wind data updating speed. Wind speed change in every 6 hours is proportionally condensed into 6 seconds to fully demonstrate a day’s wind dynamics within a visitor’s attention spam.

CREDITS

Client | Jia Yu Liu
Film Director | Yuen Hsieh
Music |Alois Bordenave

©2014 YUEN HSIEH

Currently on display @ the RCA grad show 2014

Trailer: Meanwhile by Stephen McNally

McNally’s just completed his masters degree in animation at the Royal College of Art (RCA), London, and you can see his animation short film at the RCA grad show 2014. His short is showing among hundreds and hundreds of other great pieces from his graduating fellows in visual arts, product design, architecture and what not.

I’m sure McNally will post the full short on his vimeo page soon => HERE

Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]

    Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei

    Wikipedia:

    Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being.

    Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

    Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE

    [Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]

    I embarked on the quotidian schrecklichkeit of getting up. With occasional help from Jock I weaned myself gingerly from shower to razor, from dexedrine to intolerable decision about necktie; arriving safely, forty minutes later, at the bourne of breakfast, the only breakfast worth the name, the cheminot’s breakfast, the great bowl of coffee laced and gadrooned and filigreed with rum. I was up. I had not been sick. The snail was on the thorn, to name but one.

    Morning routine of Charlie Mortdecai (with help from trusty servant Jock Strapp), from “Don’t Point That Thing At Me” by Kyril Bonfiglioli.

    (via caliginouspyxidion)

    moma:

    MoMA will present a full-scale retrospective dedicated to the multifaceted work of the composer, musician, and artist Björk in 2015. 

    [Björk, “All is Full of Love,” 1999. Directed by Chris Cunningham. Image supplied courtesy of One Little Indian.]

    Kyril Bonfiglioli (1928-1985): Accomplished fencer, a fair shot with most weapons, and a serial marrier of beautiful women. He claimed to be “abstemious in all things except drink, food, tobacco, and talking” and “loved and respected by all who knew him slightly.”
    I really need to take a break from Karl Ove Knausgaard’s dull prose (oh my god, My Struggle is so dull). Bonfiglioli’s Mortdecai Trilogy could be just what I need. Let’s make reading fun again, shall we?