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This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard]

    This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 

    Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 

    [Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard]

    The Student (El Estudiante) (2011) by Santiago Mitre

    Heady political discussions and power plays that require your full attention. Gripping and challenging, this film offers an incredible insight into university politics in today’s Argentina. A must see. 

    BAFICI:

    At first sight, this could be a tale of initiation: Roque, a young man from the interior, comes to Buenos Aires to attend college; and right when he seemed only interested in meeting girls, he starts to get involved with politics and gets ahead in his career as a student representative. But, while focusing in the sole viewpoint of its lead character Roque, the film starts to unfold a vibrant story that opens up to different directions: utilitarian relationships, the pendular oscillation between ethics and betrayal, politics as a generational issue, the youthful urge for getting quickly ahead, the perspective of a future that could either reproduce a rancid and corrupt past or imagine a different future. Santiago Mitre has not only made a film that looks into the world of college –a place rarely visited by Argentine cinema, except for maybe Dar la cara–, he has also presented university as a mirror capable of reflecting social tensions by drawing a plot with a lucid and tireless drive for narrating Argentina. If the so-called New Argentine Cinema was ever defined as non-political, El estudiante is the most brutal and brilliant rebuttal to that fallacy: it’s not only new, but also indispensable.

    [seen at a press screening during the New York Film Festival 2011, courtesy of The Once And Future Blonde]

    Son

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    Juana Molina  - Rio Seco

    I’m only now discovering the awesomeness of Argentinian music goddess Juana Molina. Her 2006 album Son in particular is full of addictive sounds, most of them experimental and quirky. "Rio Seco" is the most folky and toned down song on the album but it’s just too damn catchy not to post.

    ((currently having some major “limit exceeded” fucking issues that are making every single post counts…I’m now going to click “press post” and hope for the best…))

    El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet. El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet. El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet. El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet. El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet. El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet. El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan  José CampanellaThe Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).
I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet.

      El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan José Campanella


      The Secret In Their Eyes is not so much a crime thriller as it is a love story — two love stories, actually. The photography is so gorgeous that I had to rewind and pause the movie every so often to take screen shots. That could be the reason why I didn’t feel as emotionally engaged as I ought to have been — with the exception of the phenomenally intense elevator scene (that scene alone stirred up an explosive cocktail of emotions).

      I highly recommend it, but still, I would have given the Oscar to A Prophet.

      El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret In Their Eyes) (2009) by Juan José Campanella

      The trailer looks rather flat but this film is generating so much great buzz that I can’t wait for its UK release this August.

      Sidenote: this is the Argentinean film that beat A Prophet at this year’s Oscars in the Best Foreign Film category. I remember being pissed off about that (being one of the very few left who still care about the Oscars), but hey, I hear it was a well deserved win.