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Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics
Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

Wonderful film

    Atmen (Breathing) (2011) by Karl Markovics

    Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

    Roman Kogler, played by Thomas Schubert, is a teenage boy who grew up in an orphanage and is now a convicted criminal, imprisoned in a very grim juvenile-detention centre. He is pursuing parole applications, which depend very much on his being able to hold down a job, for which he would be allowed out daily. Finally, Roman gets work as a municipal mortuary attendant, in which – to his suppressed horror and disgust – he has to handle corpses. His co-workers are bored bullies, very like his prison warders. Yet Roman must endure this job if he is to get parole, and must each day take the subway train before dawn into Vienna, and alight just where a horribly ironic holiday ad says: “Dive into adventure”.One day, a chance discovery triggers a crisis of self-examination in Roman, and also brings in its train a real insight. We are shown that Roman’s job, so far from being the lowest of the low, is in some ways privileged. He must attend people at the moment of gravest crisis and greatest, most naked humanity. Roman and his deadpan colleagues enact secret rituals and observances. There is a poignant fascination in their having to dress the body of a naked old woman in her bedroom, while her traumatised daughter-in-law waits outside, tearfully unable to face the reality of death.The “breathing” of the title becomes a cleverly recurrent motif, and Markovics’s script circles around the themes of death and life in thoughtful and elegant ways: it is a well-carpentered screenplay which bears every sign of having been a labour of love, worked on fruitfully over many years.

    Wonderful film

    Michael (2011) by Markus Schleinzer

    Peter Bradshaw for the Guardian:

    Brilliant and macabre, this debut feature from Austrian film-maker Markus Schleinzer shows the ordinary life of a man called Michael, played by Michael Fuith. As well as being a conscientious middle-manager in an insurance office, Michael is a paedophile, keeping a 10-year-old boy locked in a reinforced cellar beneath his bungalow. The film is not merely a chilling insight into the day-to-day banality of evil, but also an unbearably suspenseful and tense drama. I can’t think of any other movie recently in which I have wanted so much to yell instructions at the screen – especially in the final five minutes, as we approach, in Graham Greene’s words, the worst horror of all.

    […]

    Michael himself is a very boring Pooter-Satan. He is a balding, bespectacled man who appears to be in a permanent, mildly bad mood and possibly clinically depressed. He is grumpy with his prisoner, a boy called Wolfgang (David Rauchenberger), allowing him up out of the cellar after a hard day in the office, fixing him supper, doing the washing-up with him and then permitting some television before bedtime. We see him disappear for certain special visits to Wolfgang’s bedroom cell, after which he washes himself in the bathroom and marks off the event in a desk diary.

    […]

    Michael is a scabrous, satirical comment on the Stockholm syndrome inherent in all parent-child relationships. What is disturbing about this story is not simply the sexual abuse, which is kept off-camera, but the way Michael and Wolfgang fall so easily into a grotesque routine that looks like family life: this is the theatre of normality that takes place up on the ground floor. (Here, the movie is comparable to Haneke’s The Seventh Continent, another truly horrible vision of violence, secrecy and family dysfunction.) Unlike the paedophiles in Todd Solondz’s Happiness (1998) and Nicole Kassell’s The Woodsman (2004), or even the child-killer in Fritz Lang’s M (1931), Michael is supremely undramatic and dull. He is subdued at work, and testy, unpleasant and cold at home. What has made him like this? What else but the normal, dreary cares and worries of being responsible for a child – the terrible imprisonment of being a single parent?

    And the film offers something else: a vision of male relationships themselves. In the brief timespan covered by the movie, Wolfgang begins to grow up, just a little; just perceptibly, he is approaching manhood, horrifyingly shaped and guided by Michael. In one of the film’s most mysterious scenes, Wolfgang gives Michael a Christmas card on which he has drawn, not a horribly ironic or parodic daddy-son picture, but two figures of equal height. Has he imagined his grownup future alongside his captor? Michael is more furious and scared by this than anything else: imagining the future, and by that token understanding the present, is something of which Michael is incapable. The performances from Fuith and Rauchenberger are superb, and Schleinzer’s direction and Gerald Kerkletz’s cinematography have the touch and sheen of cold steel.

    The banality of evil, indeed. My heart sank at the sight of those electric blinds slowly going down. But what depressed me the most was the creepy “family routine” Michael and Wolgang seemed to have set into.

    Michael is not just about the mundane, it’s also pretty gripping: the attempt of a second abduction, for example, was a scene of almost intolerable suspense.