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Ohbijou - Niagara

Niagara

Ohbijou

Metal Meets

Ohbijou - Niagara

In Their Words (via Spinner):

"Niagara" is a song about devotion and determination. It’s about putting aside romantic courtesies and demanding attention: I want it, so give it to me." — Singer Casey Mecija

Here’s a sweet indie pop band from Toronto, fronted by the Mecija sisters. This track is really lovely, it’s from their 2001 LP, Metal Meets. I remember liking their last album, Beacons, but it was a very brief encounter after which I stupidly and unintentionally erased them from my musical memory. 

[Sidenote: a bit of a far-fetch association but I keep hearing bits of St Vincent’s The Party” in this Ohbijou track]

Welcome committee, the Canadian Rockies, earlier today.

[Now, did I feel bad about the fact that I was enjoying an Elk rib eye steak when that little bugger decided to stop by my lodge and say hello?… Not one bit.]

My Dad Is 100 Years Old (2005), short film directed by Guy Maddin, and written and acted by Isabella Rossellini

In collaboration with filmmaker Guy Maddin, Isabella Rossellini celebrates the life and work of her father, director Roberto Rossellini on the 100th anniversary of his birth. With a great sense of humor, she plays all the parts: her father (she does his voice while Isaac Paz Sr. plays Roberto Rossellini’s big fat belly), her mother, Ingrid Bergman, and film icons Selznick, Fellini, Hitchcock and Chaplin.

Isabella’s love letter to her father reveals gentle feelings coping with the loss of her father, his oeuvre and his fatherhood. Sensitive and touching (not everybody agrees though: Isabella’s sister got offended by the fact that their father’s image was reduced to a big fat exposed belly).

On the set of My Dad Is 100 Years Old => HERE

Isabella in conversation with Peter Bogdanovich about My Dad Is 100 Years Old => HERE

Four men making faces at the Ukrainian Voice newspaper, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920] / Photographer: Gushul Studio, Blairmore, Alberta
Calgary’s Glenbow Museum runs a permanent exhibit exploring Alberta’s history through the lives of different mavericks — it’s aptly called “Mavericks: an incorrigible history of Alberta”. Not all featured mavericks caught my eye but there’s one couple, Thomas and Lena Gushul, who definitely did: their photography is by far the best thing in that exhibit.
Thomas Gushul immigrated to Canada from Ukraine in the early 1900s, and after working as a miner for a few years, he took up photography as a hobby and then, in 1918, as a full-time profession. He and his wife Lena ended up managing two photo studios (one in Bush Town, a rugged part of the Crowsnest Pass region, and one near Blairmore), taking thousands of photographs over five decades, and in the process leaving an important visual legacy of the life in the Crowsnest Pass.
What I love about the Gushul’s body of work is the diversity of backgrounds and cultures that it covers and its sympathetic eye towards people’s work and struggles. I also find their obvious dedication to their work admirable (they would work insane hours to perfect the quality of their work and find new processing&printing techniques) —  it’s clear that they loved what they did for a living, and that’s one thing that never fails to impress me.Thousands of Gushul images are kept at the Glenbow Archives => HERE

The Gushul family in front of their photographic studio, Blairmore, Alberta. [ca. 1920]
Religious ceremony, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Three Bukovinian women Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Two bare-fisted boxers and onlookers, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Big woman, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Worker (probably Chinese) in coveralls and jacket, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Evan Gushul with dead mouse and cat, Coleman, Alberta. [ca. 1922]

Young woman, Crownest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1925]

Women’s hockey team, Coleman, Alberta.[ca. 1929]

First Complete Workers Administration, Blairmore, Alberta. [February 1935]

Makeshift sleeping accommodations, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1935](Sleeping accommodations for transients or possibly miners during the Depression)

Thomas and Lena Gushul, photographers, Blairmore, Alberta.(Thomas Gushul is holding of portrait of their daughter, Paraska)

Four men making faces at the Ukrainian Voice newspaper, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920] / Photographer: Gushul Studio, Blairmore, Alberta

Calgary’s Glenbow Museum runs a permanent exhibit exploring Alberta’s history through the lives of different mavericks — it’s aptly called “Mavericks: an incorrigible history of Alberta”. Not all featured mavericks caught my eye but there’s one couple, Thomas and Lena Gushul, who definitely did: their photography is by far the best thing in that exhibit.

Thomas Gushul immigrated to Canada from Ukraine in the early 1900s, and after working as a miner for a few years, he took up photography as a hobby and then, in 1918, as a full-time profession. He and his wife Lena ended up managing two photo studios (one in Bush Town, a rugged part of the Crowsnest Pass region, and one near Blairmore), taking thousands of photographs over five decades, and in the process leaving an important visual legacy of the life in the Crowsnest Pass.

What I love about the Gushul’s body of work is the diversity of backgrounds and cultures that it covers and its sympathetic eye towards people’s work and struggles. I also find their obvious dedication to their work admirable (they would work insane hours to perfect the quality of their work and find new processing&printing techniques) — it’s clear that they loved what they did for a living, and that’s one thing that never fails to impress me.

Thousands of Gushul images are kept at the Glenbow Archives => HERE

The Gushul family in front of their photographic studio, Blairmore, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Religious ceremony, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Three Bukovinian women Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Two bare-fisted boxers and onlookers, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Big woman, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Worker (probably Chinese) in coveralls and jacket, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Evan Gushul with dead mouse and cat, Coleman, Alberta. [ca. 1922]

Young woman, Crownest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1925]

Women’s hockey team, Coleman, Alberta.[ca. 1929]

First Complete Workers Administration, Blairmore, Alberta. [February 1935]

Makeshift sleeping accommodations, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1935]
(Sleeping accommodations for transients or possibly miners during the Depression)

Thomas and Lena Gushul, photographers, Blairmore, Alberta.
(Thomas Gushul is holding of portrait of their daughter, Paraska)


Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas To Heaven

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Godspeed You! Black Emperor -  Storm

For those of you who have 20 minutes to spare, I’d recommend listening to this track. Instrumental heaven. I can consume this tune in its entirety as easily and frequently as I do a 2-minute Beatles song, but that’s just me.

((GY!BE are playing three dates in London this December. I bought a ticket a few months ago but it now turns out that I’ll be in their homeland that week. Bugger of Irony is what I have to say to that.))

Mary Margaret O’Hara - Body’s In Trouble

Body’s In Trouble

Mary Margaret O’Hara

Miss America

Mary Margaret O’Hara - Body’s In Trouble

thenotes
:

Just catching up to the fact that there exists this perfectionist Canadian cult heroine singer-songwriter who coined an idiosyncratic jazzy country sound (with shades of Bowie glam, even, on this particular track?) and had XTC’s Andy Partridge fired as the producer of her 1988 debut/pretty much lone album because he was an atheist. Oh and that she is sister to this O’Hara. Sometimes the vastness of all I don’t know about music leaves me panic-stricken.   

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World (2010) by Edgar Wright

There’s so much cool coming at you in this film (and right from the start with the über nifty Universal Studios 8-bit opening theme), it’s unbelievable. The visual effects are not just stunning to look at, they’re also very cleverly embedded in the storytelling (e.g. Ramona Flowers is the hot girl so it’s no wonder than when she roller-skates her way through the snowy streets of Toronto, she leaves a trail of melted snow behind)… Candy for the eyes (and the ears), really.

But even though the film is technically incredibly precise (probably leaving very little latitude for improv acting), it still manages to feel completely loose and spontaneous, and that’s thanks to the excellent cast: all young actors but all veteran performers. They seem incredibly engaged in their parts and it’s clear that they’re having tremendous fun. There are quite a few scene stealers among them — Kieran Culkin and Johnny Simmons most noticeably. Jason Schwartzman, Alison Pill and Culkin are old favourites of mine and they certainly don’t disappoint here. As for Michael Cera, I think he’s tonally perfect as Scott (contrary to most people, I don’t have Cera fatigue). There’s this little pun he likes to use when talking about Edgar Wright: Edgar’s middle name is Gets It, as in Edgar Gets It Wright… Lame? Sure, but damn right he is.

Favourite scene: Scott and Knives’s neat little ninja choreography over the arcade game they’re playing together (the first time around).

Favourite Evil Ex: Roxy. For her moves, her visual gimmicks, her look, and her ‘tude obviously.