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Plants and Animals - Before

Before

Plants and Animals

The End of That

Plants and Animals - Before (Live @ Q Studios)

This version is a live rendition of “Before” from a recent Q session with Jian Ghomeshi the band did to promote their new album, The End of That. Compared to their previous stuff, there’s definitely less “fantaisie” in the new record… Still, I quite like it. 

You can download the album for free => HERE (link expires 24th March)

Plants and Animals - Lightshow

Lightshow

Plants and Animals

The End of That

Download

Plants and Animals — Lightshow

Drummer Matthew Woodman Woodley (via Spinner):

We took this one apart like an old clock and put the pieces back together, over and over. But it wouldn’t click. It walked funny. It was a crazy puzzle, an enigma. It was one of those Gordian Knots. Once we got that, all our worries went out the window. All love. It was a eureka moment. Now it’s a eureka moment for everybody in the world.

Ohbijou - Niagara

Niagara

Ohbijou

Metal Meets

Ohbijou - Niagara

In Their Words (via Spinner):

"Niagara" is a song about devotion and determination. It’s about putting aside romantic courtesies and demanding attention: I want it, so give it to me." — Singer Casey Mecija

Here’s a sweet indie pop band from Toronto, fronted by the Mecija sisters. This track is really lovely, it’s from their 2001 LP, Metal Meets. I remember liking their last album, Beacons, but it was a very brief encounter after which I stupidly and unintentionally erased them from my musical memory. 

[Sidenote: a bit of a far-fetch association but I keep hearing bits of St Vincent’s The Party” in this Ohbijou track]

Welcome committee, the Canadian Rockies, earlier today.

[Now, did I feel bad about the fact that I was enjoying an Elk rib eye steak when that little bugger decided to stop by my lodge and say hello?… Not one bit.]

My Dad Is 100 Years Old (2005), short film directed by Guy Maddin, and written and acted by Isabella Rossellini

In collaboration with filmmaker Guy Maddin, Isabella Rossellini celebrates the life and work of her father, director Roberto Rossellini on the 100th anniversary of his birth. With a great sense of humor, she plays all the parts: her father (she does his voice while Isaac Paz Sr. plays Roberto Rossellini’s big fat belly), her mother, Ingrid Bergman, and film icons Selznick, Fellini, Hitchcock and Chaplin.

Isabella’s love letter to her father reveals gentle feelings coping with the loss of her father, his oeuvre and his fatherhood. Sensitive and touching (not everybody agrees though: Isabella’s sister got offended by the fact that their father’s image was reduced to a big fat exposed belly).

On the set of My Dad Is 100 Years Old => HERE

Isabella in conversation with Peter Bogdanovich about My Dad Is 100 Years Old => HERE

Four men making faces at the Ukrainian Voice newspaper, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920] / Photographer: Gushul Studio, Blairmore, Alberta
Calgary’s Glenbow Museum runs a permanent exhibit exploring Alberta’s history through the lives of different mavericks — it’s aptly called “Mavericks: an incorrigible history of Alberta”. Not all featured mavericks caught my eye but there’s one couple, Thomas and Lena Gushul, who definitely did: their photography is by far the best thing in that exhibit.
Thomas Gushul immigrated to Canada from Ukraine in the early 1900s, and after working as a miner for a few years, he took up photography as a hobby and then, in 1918, as a full-time profession. He and his wife Lena ended up managing two photo studios (one in Bush Town, a rugged part of the Crowsnest Pass region, and one near Blairmore), taking thousands of photographs over five decades, and in the process leaving an important visual legacy of the life in the Crowsnest Pass.
What I love about the Gushul’s body of work is the diversity of backgrounds and cultures that it covers and its sympathetic eye towards people’s work and struggles. I also find their obvious dedication to their work admirable (they would work insane hours to perfect the quality of their work and find new processing&printing techniques) —  it’s clear that they loved what they did for a living, and that’s one thing that never fails to impress me.Thousands of Gushul images are kept at the Glenbow Archives => HERE

The Gushul family in front of their photographic studio, Blairmore, Alberta. [ca. 1920]
Religious ceremony, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Three Bukovinian women Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Two bare-fisted boxers and onlookers, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Big woman, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Worker (probably Chinese) in coveralls and jacket, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Evan Gushul with dead mouse and cat, Coleman, Alberta. [ca. 1922]

Young woman, Crownest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1925]

Women’s hockey team, Coleman, Alberta.[ca. 1929]

First Complete Workers Administration, Blairmore, Alberta. [February 1935]

Makeshift sleeping accommodations, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1935](Sleeping accommodations for transients or possibly miners during the Depression)

Thomas and Lena Gushul, photographers, Blairmore, Alberta.(Thomas Gushul is holding of portrait of their daughter, Paraska)

Four men making faces at the Ukrainian Voice newspaper, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920] / Photographer: Gushul Studio, Blairmore, Alberta

Calgary’s Glenbow Museum runs a permanent exhibit exploring Alberta’s history through the lives of different mavericks — it’s aptly called “Mavericks: an incorrigible history of Alberta”. Not all featured mavericks caught my eye but there’s one couple, Thomas and Lena Gushul, who definitely did: their photography is by far the best thing in that exhibit.

Thomas Gushul immigrated to Canada from Ukraine in the early 1900s, and after working as a miner for a few years, he took up photography as a hobby and then, in 1918, as a full-time profession. He and his wife Lena ended up managing two photo studios (one in Bush Town, a rugged part of the Crowsnest Pass region, and one near Blairmore), taking thousands of photographs over five decades, and in the process leaving an important visual legacy of the life in the Crowsnest Pass.

What I love about the Gushul’s body of work is the diversity of backgrounds and cultures that it covers and its sympathetic eye towards people’s work and struggles. I also find their obvious dedication to their work admirable (they would work insane hours to perfect the quality of their work and find new processing&printing techniques) — it’s clear that they loved what they did for a living, and that’s one thing that never fails to impress me.

Thousands of Gushul images are kept at the Glenbow Archives => HERE

The Gushul family in front of their photographic studio, Blairmore, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Religious ceremony, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Three Bukovinian women Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Two bare-fisted boxers and onlookers, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Big woman, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.[ca. 1920]

Worker (probably Chinese) in coveralls and jacket, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1920]

Evan Gushul with dead mouse and cat, Coleman, Alberta. [ca. 1922]

Young woman, Crownest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1925]

Women’s hockey team, Coleman, Alberta.[ca. 1929]

First Complete Workers Administration, Blairmore, Alberta. [February 1935]

Makeshift sleeping accommodations, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta. [ca. 1935]
(Sleeping accommodations for transients or possibly miners during the Depression)

Thomas and Lena Gushul, photographers, Blairmore, Alberta.
(Thomas Gushul is holding of portrait of their daughter, Paraska)