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Moi @ Villa Ocupada, Nantes, 5 August 2014

- Sorry for the selfie post (cringe!) but the last one was back in 2009, so… so? 

- Sorry for the posing (double cringe!) but I couldn’t help it: my facial muscles tensed up of their own accord.

- Not sorry for the beard: ma maman is giving me grief over it but children and pets are now running away from me so I’m keeping it. 

- Not sorry for the ungroomed beard: the point of my beard is to stop caring altogether about all that shaving and grooming shit. Can’t there be elegance to be found in being a slob? Can I turn it into an art? Sort of related: I stopped ironing years ago.

- The intrusion of the colour white in my hair and beard is there to remind me that I’m about to leave my 30s behind me.. Imminently. I am not happy about this. Not happy at all. 

- Photo taken on the ground floor of Villa Ocupada, a building that will be entirely gone this time next year. 

This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard] This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 
Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 
[Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard]

    This is my favourite room in Villa Ocupada, Nantes. The room was created by Ever, an artist from Buenos Aires. 

    Villa Ocupada is part of Le voyage à Nantes. They’ve asked a bunch of mural artists to transform a local administration building that is due to be taken down in 2015. They’ve dressed it up from top to bottom and the result is fantastic. 

    [Some of the photos — the best ones — are © David Gallard]

    Zouzou (sur sa terrace), Beziers, France, Tuesday 29 July 2014

    "R" month or not, it’s oysters all year round for papa. (Plus copious amounts of wine.) I totally approve.

    Featured wine: Secret des Capitelles (cave de Saint-Chinian), Blanc, 2013
    Featured oysters: Bouzigues Oysters, No. 2

    Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London] Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis
Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.
Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.
And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.
She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.
 [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London]

      Les Salauds (Bastards) (2013) by Claire Denis

      Unfuckingbelievable. No matter how serious and dedicated I’ve tried to be about watching films over the past 25 years, my opinions can feel so utterly random and oh-so dependent on my mood. I remember seeing Trouble Every Day, hating it instantly & with passion, feeling pretty good about hating it, and never looking back… As I was watching Bastards tonight, it felt that I should have hated it for the exact same reasons as Trouble — something about the fabric of both films that felt similar to me (although two completely different genres: vampire gore vs film noir)… But god knows why, something clicked pretty early on during Bastards, and I embraced it.

      Maybe I was in the right mood for it. Maybe Chiara Mastroianni's face did it for me. Maybe Tindersticks' awesome claustrophobic score had also something to do with it (although loving Tinderstick's soundtrack on Trouble Every Day didn’t prevent me from despising that film). Or could it be the eerie&classy Haussmannian Parisian building where most of the sexy scenes take place — the creaking floorboards, the high ceilings, the cold austere dark stairwell.

      And maybe listening to Claire Denis talk after the screening helped.

      She was being interviewed in English, and although her English is really good, she had to search for the right words, and I think that forced her to be extra thoughtful. I think she would have been a little more careless with her words in French (a consequence of fluency, I guess)… or maybe not, scrap that. Anyway, I liked that she thought long and hard before answering. She talked about her hate of the word “auteur”. Se talked about her attraction for the masculinity of male characters in cinema, how those characters are often grounded in reality, and the innocence that can be found in masculinity. With Bastards, she wanted Vincent Lindon to be strong, heroic, manly, but despite all that, she wanted him to be helpless and ultimately “fucked by the story”. I liked that. She talked about the challenges of shooting digital. She talked about her love of scouting for locations, how each location would dictate her use of close ups vs wide shots, and how shooting on location creates a certain rough quality on screen that she seeks. She talked well and carefully about other things too. And she wore a cool black leather jacket, which, again, could be why I liked her film… That’s how flaky I can be.

       [See on Tue 4 February 2014 @ Curzon Soho, London]

      Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne
I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.
It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 
[Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]
[Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013]

        Les garçons et Guillaume, à table (Me, Myself and Mum) (2013) by Guillaume Gallienne

        I spent a few days in France over Christmas and crammed as many French films (on the big screen) as time would allow me while I was there. Crucial considering how poorly non-Ozon France is represented in UK cinemas. I knew absolutely nothing about Les garçons et Guillaume, à table apart from the fact that my own mum loved it and that Guillaume Gallienne played both main roles (himself and his mother). So I went, and boy did I laugh. I laughed, and laughed, and laughed. And laughed some more. One might also find it poignant and what not, but really, it’s just hilarious.

        It’s a screen adaptation of Gallienne’s own autobiographical one-man show and the film is currently enjoying a phenomenal success in France. It’s been bought by distributors around the world but it looks like the UK and the US are waiting to see how it fares internationally before deciding to get it — they might be wondering, rightly so, if the film’s humour will translate that well abroad, but I really hope they do show it. 

        [Sidenote: Françoise Fabian is very funny as the grandmother+ fun cameos from Reda Kateb and Diane Kruger]

        [Seen @ Cinéma Katorza, Nantes, 26 December 2013]

        Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013] Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré
For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).
Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.
…
Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013]

          Suzanne (2013) by Katell Quillévéré

          For the superb acting (Sara Forestier as Suzanne, François Damiens as her dad, Adèle Haenel as her sister, Paul Hamy as her lover & demise).

          Catherine Shoard for the Guardian:

          the sort of woozily shot, remorselessly emotional, acutely observed socio-realist soap that both confounds and confirms chick-flick prejudice.

          Yet the brilliance of Quillévéré’s direction is in the performances she coaxes from her cast, and the clear-eyed, non-judgmental way she presents them. François Damiens, a Belgian actor previously seen bumbling about in the likes of Heartbreaker and Delicacy, is brilliant as the father: almost unbearably moving in a courthouse scene in which a roll-call of minor charges are levelled at his daughter, whom he hasn’t seen for years. As the sister who moves from tearaway to matriarch, Adèle Haenel is terrific, too; but Sara Forestier is just indelible in the lead, brimful of feeling and sympathetic stupidity, now depressed, now quixotic, never obvious or vain.

          [Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 26 December 2013]

          Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013] Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch
Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.
Random notes: 
- Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  
- Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 
- … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.
[Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013]

            Casse-tête chinois (Chinese Puzzle) (2013) by Cédric Klapisch

            Entertaining fluff. I realised a few minutes in that Casse-tête chinois was actually the final instalment of a trilogy, following L’Auberge Espagnole (2002) and Les Poupées russes (2005), two films I hadn’t seen. It didn’t spoil the fun one bit — the film stands on its own quite nicely. But interestingly enough, I still have no intention of seeing the first two parts — that’s how much I care about the whole thing. Because, although I had a great time, the film shows a spectacular lack of originality when it comes to plot & characters. And it’s got to be one of the most cliché portrayals of New York I’ve ever seen on screen. Still, it’s well paced, well acted, it’s got plenty of funny bits and, to be fair, a few insightful(ish) observations about the-French-in-NYC culture shock.

            Random notes: 

            Audrey Tautou's speech in Mandarin is hilarious and my favourite comedy scene by far.  

            - Wow, Li Jun Li is fucking adorable. Her part strikes me as rather bland on the page, but there’s something about her that completely transcends it. 

            - … And on the opposite end of of the adorability scale, we’ve got Isabelle (Cécile De France) as an utterly despicable character. What’s ironic about it is that I think the filmmakers’ intention was to write her as likable. I may be wrong and seeing the previous two films might give me a better understanding of her character. If only I cared.

            [Seen @ Gaumont cinema, Nantes, 25 December 2013]