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Chez Alexandre et Fils, Montreal, 9 Feb 2009

A photo I took when my back problem was at its worst. Over the course of a month my work made me fly economy to Bali, Houston, NYC and Montreal. At a time when I could barely walk and couldn’t manage the upright position. I was completely broken… How the fuck did I survive those trips, I wonder? Anyway anyway good times but what’s prompting this very lame reminiscencing of mine is re-reading stories I posted on cowbird.com a few years ago. That Montreal snapshot is still very vivid in my mind. Along with the back pain.

Man, was I grateful to Alexandre and his sons that day. I had been limping my way through Montreal in search of a place to rest — and when I say “limping” I mean “crawling on all fours”. My sciatica was killing me and by the time I reached Alexandre’s brasserie I was bent in half, on the verge of (not-so-manly) tears.

As soon as I got in, I knew I had stricken gold. The place was inviting, cozy and was buzzing with just enough hustle and bustle to give it a great vibe. Most of the patrons were Suits On Their Lunch Break — they all looked like they were holding on to their jobs just so they could continue to hang at Alexandre’s.

The food was great-value-for-money — your classic no-frills brasserie fare — and the Chablis (a lot of it) made the back pain go away. I was happy.

But what made that lunch so memorable was what was happening at the table next to mine: it was occupied by a woman and a man in their late 40s, fresh out of a board meeting I bet, both looking sleek and attractive, and they were in what looked like a serious conversation… Except they were discussing the merits of Buffy and Battlestar Galactica. That’s right. I could not believe what I was hearing. I was awestruck. At that moment I thought the Canadians were the coolest people on earth and that Montreal was the hottest place to be.

That Montreal trip was the last straw that broke this camel’s back. I went back to London and lived completely horizontal for a couple of months until I had surgery.

………………………………..

Alexandre et fils

1454 rue Peel, 
Montréal (Québec) H3A 1S8
Canada 
Tel. : (514) 288-5105

Majical Cloudz - Bugs Don’t Buzz

The cheesiest songs all end with a smile
This won’t end with a smile, my love

Wait with me in slimy wet darkness
I’ll be right beside you, my love

Bugs don’t buzz when their time approaches
We’ll be just like the roaches, my love

It pays to be on the edge of existence
Just riding the surface, my love

The happiest songs all end with a smile
This might end with a smile, no my love

If life could be forever one instant
Would it be the moment you met me? No my love

Majical Cloudz - Childhood’s End

britticisms:

It’s always so great to hear new music from Majical Cloudz. Despite my current love of bleeps and bloops, I’ve always found utterly earnest vocalists so compelling. That sort of authentic, raw vulnerability sounds so rare on contemporary records, but when you hear it, you can’t help but turn to it again and again.

Arcade Fire - We Exist

tuneage:

The best music videos are a fully realized version of their song’s premise, a compelling visual adaptation of its themes. Here, the Grammy winners have emerged with a David Wilson directed video that is at once strange and sweet, unexpected and beautiful, teaming up with actor Andrew Garfield to tell a story that benefits from his total commitment to the performance, and from the singular tension between live and recorded art.

Filmed in part during their headlining set at Coachella — and afterwards in a bedroom, a bar, a dance floor — that performance is given new and layered meaning through this release, one that suggests a new way to integrate performance with video. It accomplishes this while also presenting polished visuals, and a relevant social message well-suited to the song, without ever feeling redundant or self-important. 

Reflektor is out on Merge Records, pretty much everywhere. This is the second single. 

Kiesza - Hideaway

pierreism:

tuneage:

Are we in a new golden age for dance videos? Here, Kiesza gives us gorgeous choreography performed in a single take for “Hideaway.” It’s the classically trained Canadian ballerina’s debut single, filmed with a broken rib, before debuting at the top of the UK singles chart last month. 

With Arcade Fire’s recent entry into the genre, the continuing reign of Beyonce and Justin Timberlake, plus upcoming releases from dance vid queen Robyn, and even a posthumous album from genre originator Michael Jackson, it seems the long tradition of getting down in front of a camera is on a rise.

Every dance club & radio station has been blasting this virtually non-stop since January. And it’s still the best.

Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013]

    Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve

    Good thriller. A few things:

    - A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.

    - Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 

    - Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 

    - The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.

    - I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 

    [Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013]