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Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013]

    Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve

    Good thriller. A few things:

    - A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.

    - Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 

    - Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 

    - The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.

    - I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 

    [Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013]

    Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013]

      Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley

      Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).

      Not to be missed.

      [Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013]

      Waterpark, a short film by Evan Prosofsky

      Nowness (Shorts on Sundays series):

      Artificial waves crash and swimsuit-clad patrons frolic in the strange suburban utopia of World Waterpark in Alberta, Canada, in cinematographer Evan Prosofsky’s first directorial effort, launching an open call for submissions to our new Shorts on Sundays series via the NOWNESS Vimeo channel. The aquatic playground cast as the uncanny protagonist in Waterpark is located inside the West Edmonton Mall, North America’s largest shopping destination. “I never seemed to adjust to the absurdity,” says the director of shooting in his hometown’s famous fantasyland. “Even as a kid, I just couldn’t believe we had flamingos, submarines, roller coasters, and pirate ships in our mall.” The increasingly sought-after cinematographer became known as the lensman behind several of last year’s most shared music videos, including Grimes’ “Oblivion,” Bat for Lashes’ “All Your Gold” and Grizzly Bear’s “Yet Again.” Sound features prominently in Waterpark, too, with the soundtrack composed by Prosofsky’s friend Alex Zhang Hungtai, aka Dirty Beaches, infusing the innocent family environment with a seductive, contemplative undertone. “[Evan] told me of his experience there as a child,” says the Taiwanese-born Canadian musician of the effort. “That helped me understand his perspective, and I liked how neutral and non-judgmental it was.” Shot over a span of three years, the labor of love hints at the anxiety that lays dormant behind an otherwise glossy North American leisure culture. “Once I was in there,” Prosofsky recalls of shooting in plain view. “No one paid me the slightest bit of attention.” We asked Emily Kai Bock to share her thoughts on her collaborator’s uncommon vision and process.

      Waterpark is an early glimpse into the way Evan has structured his life around the craft of cinematography—being a typical teen working at the West Edmonton mall, but using his money and time off to go to the expense of documenting the space for hours on 16mm. It’s rare to find that kind of devotion and love for the craft with a cinematographer. I’ve led him into many situations on several videos where his equipment could have been confiscated or ruined by the conditions. When we were shooting Grizzly Bear’s “Yet Again” I remember watching him as he read the manual for a HydroFlex underwater housing before dropping it into a swimming pool with his own 35mm camera inside. The camera was safe, but it demonstrated that getting the shot was more valuable to him then his own equipment. His knowledge has provided an unwavering buoyancy through our sink-or-swim shoots.