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Majical Cloudz - Bugs Don’t Buzz

The cheesiest songs all end with a smile
This won’t end with a smile, my love

Wait with me in slimy wet darkness
I’ll be right beside you, my love

Bugs don’t buzz when their time approaches
We’ll be just like the roaches, my love

It pays to be on the edge of existence
Just riding the surface, my love

The happiest songs all end with a smile
This might end with a smile, no my love

If life could be forever one instant
Would it be the moment you met me? No my love

Majical Cloudz - Childhood’s End

britticisms:

It’s always so great to hear new music from Majical Cloudz. Despite my current love of bleeps and bloops, I’ve always found utterly earnest vocalists so compelling. That sort of authentic, raw vulnerability sounds so rare on contemporary records, but when you hear it, you can’t help but turn to it again and again.

Arcade Fire - We Exist

tuneage:

The best music videos are a fully realized version of their song’s premise, a compelling visual adaptation of its themes. Here, the Grammy winners have emerged with a David Wilson directed video that is at once strange and sweet, unexpected and beautiful, teaming up with actor Andrew Garfield to tell a story that benefits from his total commitment to the performance, and from the singular tension between live and recorded art.

Filmed in part during their headlining set at Coachella — and afterwards in a bedroom, a bar, a dance floor — that performance is given new and layered meaning through this release, one that suggests a new way to integrate performance with video. It accomplishes this while also presenting polished visuals, and a relevant social message well-suited to the song, without ever feeling redundant or self-important. 

Reflektor is out on Merge Records, pretty much everywhere. This is the second single. 

Kiesza - Hideaway

pierreism:

tuneage:

Are we in a new golden age for dance videos? Here, Kiesza gives us gorgeous choreography performed in a single take for “Hideaway.” It’s the classically trained Canadian ballerina’s debut single, filmed with a broken rib, before debuting at the top of the UK singles chart last month. 

With Arcade Fire’s recent entry into the genre, the continuing reign of Beyonce and Justin Timberlake, plus upcoming releases from dance vid queen Robyn, and even a posthumous album from genre originator Michael Jackson, it seems the long tradition of getting down in front of a camera is on a rise.

Every dance club & radio station has been blasting this virtually non-stop since January. And it’s still the best.

Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013] Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve
Good thriller. A few things:
- A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.
- Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 
- Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 
- The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.
- I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 
[Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013]

    Prisoners (2013) by Denis Villeneuve

    Good thriller. A few things:

    - A-list cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman & Maria Bello, Terrance Howard & Viola Davis, Melissa Leo & Paul Dano. Of that bunch, Gyllenhaal and Jackman’s characters are the focus of the film and the most developed, so not surprisingly those are the two performances that really stand out. Those two are pretty much constantly at odds so their scenes together are particularly tense and testosterone-charged. Two fine actors.

    - Gyllenhaal did Prisoners right after shooting Enemy, another film by Villeneuve. Hence the on-set performance shorthand between actor and director, which I’m sure helped Gyllenhaal flesh out and fine tune detective Loki. I love the fact that we’re told and shown nothing of Loki’s personal life and circumstances outside the investigation — we only see him on the job. It’s really impressive how rich and complex a character Loki turns out to be, considering how little we know about him… A few key hints here and there: alone in a diner for Thanksgiving, his quiet demeanor interrupted by occasional bursts of anger and frustration, his nervous facial twitch, his buttoned-up shirt and slick hairdo, the tattoos he’s hiding. 

    - Paul Dano’s got the perfect face for his part — he looks particularly great when being intimidated or tortured. I don’t how he does it but he can look stoic and absolutely terrified at the same time. 

    - The film looks stunning and very atmospheric during all those scenes when we’re taken outside at night. Great lighting.

    - I would have simplified the plot and given Melissa Leo the proper screen time her character deserves. Holy Jones is a key player in the story and in my opinion the script completely lets her down. Too bad, Leo’s invested a lot in that part (ref to this interview => HERE) but she’s not given enough room to show that on screen. 

    [Seen @ Empire Leicester Square, London, 4 December 2013]

    Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013] Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley
Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).
Not to be missed.
[Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013]

      Stories We Tell (2012) by Sarah Polley

      Stories We Tell is a wonderful exercise in the art of story telling — cleverly put together. It’s also a beautifully drawn family portrait, at the centre of which stands the myth of Sarah’s mother (impossible not to fall for her charismatic personality, by the way). I also love how Polley spices up the film’s narrative with a few perfectly timed twists and turns (the final line alone is priceless).

      Not to be missed.

      [Seen @ Curzon on Demand, 1 July 2013]