You can email me
Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014] Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.
Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 
Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.
Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 
Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 
[Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014]

    Lilting (2014) by Hong Khaou

    Lilting tells the story of a mother’s attempt at understanding who her son (Kai, played by Andrew Leung) is after his untimely death. Her world is suddenly disrupted by the presence of his lover. Together, they attempt to overcome their grief whilst struggling against not having a shared language.

    Pei-pei Cheng plays Junn, Kai’s mother. 

    Ben Whishaw plays Richard, Kai’s lover.

    Naomi Christie plays Vann, the translator that Richard hires to help him communicate with Junn.

    A bit too affected self-conscious at times, maybe? But barely — this is a delicate film, crafted and acted with real finesse. I find Kai’s ghostly apparitions seamless and always perfectly timed. I also love Van’s contribution to the story and how she can’t help but interfere, struggling to keep her neutrality. 

    Side note: I was secretly hoping to see Pei-pei Cheung throw darts at Alan (the English pensioner who plays her love interest at first but quickly falls out of favour with her), but alas Lilting is no Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Here, her weapon of choice is her sharp tongue. 

    [Seen on Curzon on Demand, Friday 5 September 2014]

    Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters. Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

This film really strikes a chord with me  — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.
Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.
Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters.

      Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

      Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

      This film really strikes a chord with me — work has often put me in extreme situations testing my ethics and principles, and just like Sandra and her colleagues in the latest Dardenne film, making the right decision is far from easy.

      Sandra’s journey over that insanely trying weekend is gripping and poignant (but fear not, the Dardenne brothers have always avoided sentimentality like the plague). The ending has a clever twist, and I find it pitch-perfect and inspiring.

      Side note: Deux Jours, une nuit came as a much needed breath of fresh air in a film&TV landscape overloaded with striking visuals and beautiful cinematography. I had been seriously losing myself in that world, screen-grabbing the fuck out of everything I was watching — a highly time-consuming habit by the way, considering that an hour of film could take me two hours to watch because of compulsive screen grabbing… So yeah, it was rather nice to break that vicious cycle with a no-frills piece of fiction driven purely by plot, social realism and characters.