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Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.
Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

    Deux jours, une nuit (Two Days, One Night) (2014) by Jean-Pierre Dardenne & Luc Dardenne

    Sandra, a young Belgian mother, discovers that her workmates have opted for a significant pay bonus, in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so that she can keep her job.

    Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014] Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan
A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else. 
+Stunning Anatolian landscapes
+Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful. 
+Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 
So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!
Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 
[Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014]

      Kış Uykusu (Winter Sleep) (2014) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan

      A masterpiece. I really liked Once Upon A Time in Anatolia, but man, Ceylan’s latest film is something else.

      +Stunning Anatolian landscapes

      +Great use of dim lighting. I still remember that exterior night scene in Once Upon A Time that was entirely lit with car headlights — Powerfully atmospheric. Masterful.

      +Superb writing & flawless acting. I’m thinking in particular of a couple of intense conversations when Aydin settles the scores with his sister and then with his wife. Very Huis Clos-esque…L’enfer c’est les autres?  Oh yes,big time. 

      So, would it be premature of me to call Winter Sleep the best film of 2014 when the year is so far from over? What the hell not, let’s!

      Note to self: Add Aydin’s Hotel Othello in the Steppes of Anatolia on the list of fictional hotels to book somehow. Another one is The Grand Budapest Hotel (in the Republic of Zubrowka). 

      [Seen @ L’Alcazar, Asnières-sur-Seine, Wednesday 6 August 2014]

      Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014] Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer
In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 
- Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).
- Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.
- Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.
- The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astrée, an ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon. 
So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

[Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014]

        Maestro (2014) by Léa Fazer

        In a gist: Young struggling moronic-but-charming actor gets cast by the Grand Master of Arty Farty French Cinema to play the title role in his latest high-brow art film. Cut to a delightfully chaotic shoot due to the (very) low-budget nature of the film. On-set slapstick-ish and vaudevillesque comedy ensues. Oh and our hero falls in love with his co-star, of course — she’s beautiful but way too intellectual for him and oh-so condescending towards him. But fear not, she will give in, although I frankly didn’t give a flying fuck because the only relationship that mattered — the one at the centre of the film — is the friendship that the young moronic actor strikes with the old Master filmmaker. 

        Pio Marmaï plays Henri Renaud, our young moronic-but-charming hero (yeah yeah, we keep rooting for him to get the girl).

        Michael Lonsdale plays Cédric Rovère, the old director.

        Déborah François plays Gloria, the girl.

        - The film within the film — the one that Cédric Rovère is shooting with his young band of actors — is inspired by L’Astréean ancient epic French novel that tells the story of two Forezian shepherds called Astrée and Céladon

        So although fun and light on its feet, and with some rare but genuinely tender moments, Maestro is rather forgettable… Except that there’s one thing that elevates it to a certain level of poignancy: its genesis. Maestro was co-written by French actor Jocelyn Quivrin who died in a car accident in 2009 before he had the chance to start shooting it. He based the story on his encounter with Grand Director Éric Rohmer and their collaboration on the film Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon. So actually Henri Renaud isJocelyn Quivrin and Cédric Rovère is Eric Rohmer. As for Gloria, she’s based on French actress Alice Taglioni whom Quivrin met not on the set of Les Amours d’Astrée et de Céladon but on different film. They were still together at the time of Quivrin’s death in 2009. Rohmer died a few months later. Maestro is dedicated to both of them. 

        [Seen @ Cinéma Gaumont Nantes, Nantes, Saturday 2 August 2014]

        It’s about Time (By Holly Willis)

        Boyhood spans 12 years, but it’s always in the moment.

        Linklater’s attentive portrait of a Texan boy named Mason is less about what it means to be a young male than it is an evocation of another key theme in the filmmaker’s body of work, namely time. And not just time as a philosophical concept, but our time, the present moment, and what it means to be alive now. Right now.

        Full review => HERE