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It’s about Time (By Holly Willis)

Boyhood spans 12 years, but it’s always in the moment.

Linklater’s attentive portrait of a Texan boy named Mason is less about what it means to be a young male than it is an evocation of another key theme in the filmmaker’s body of work, namely time. And not just time as a philosophical concept, but our time, the present moment, and what it means to be alive now. Right now.

Full review => HERE

Way out west there was this fella I wanna tell ya about. Goes by the name of Jeff Lebowski. At least that was the handle his loving parents gave him, but he never had much use for it himself. This Lebowski, he called himself “The Dude”. Now, “Dude” - that’s a name no man would self-apply where I come from. But then there was a lot about the Dude that didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me. And a lot about where he lived, likewise. But then again, maybe that’s why I found the place so darned interestin’. They call Los Angeles the “City Of Angels”. I didn’t find it to be that, exactly. But I’ll allow it as there are some nice folks there. ‘Course I can’t say I seen London, and I never been to France. And I ain’t never seen no queen in her damned undies, as the feller says. But I’ll tell you what - after seeing Los Angeles, and this here story I’m about to unfold, well, I guess I seen somethin’ every bit as stupefyin’ as you’d seen in any of them other places. And in English, too. So I can die with a smile on my face, without feelin’ like the good Lord gypped me. Now this here story I’m about to unfold took place in the early ’90s - just about the time of our conflict with Sad’m and the I-raqis. I only mention it because sometimes there’s a man… I won’t say a hero, ‘cause, what’s a hero? But sometimes, there’s a man. And I’m talkin’ about the Dude here - the Dude from Los Angeles. Sometimes, there’s a man, well, he’s the man for his time and place. He fits right in there. And that’s the Dude. In Los Angeles. And even if he’s a lazy man - and the Dude was most certainly that. Quite possibly the laziest in Los Angeles County, which would place him high in the runnin’ for laziest worldwide. But sometimes there’s a man. Sometimes, there’s a man… Well, I lost my train of thought here. But… aw, hell. I’ve done introduced it enough. 

(via elvira)

Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014] Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater
wikipedia:

The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 


In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.
In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.


A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through time…”The little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater




Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.
Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014]

    Boyhood (2014) by Richard Linklater

    wikipedia:

    The film was shot intermittently over a twelve-year period: filming began in the summer of 2002 and completed in October 2013. 
    In May 2002, film director and screenwriter Richard Linklater announced that he would begin shooting the then unnamed film in his home city of Austin, Texas in the summer of 2002. At that time, Linklater planned to assemble the cast and crew a few weeks out of every year to shoot the story over a 12-year period, reasoning that, “I’ve long wanted to tell the story of a parent-child relationship that follows a boy from the first through the 12th grade and ends with him going off to college. But the dilemma is that kids change so much that it is impossible to cover that much ground. And I am totally ready to adapt the story to whatever he is going through.” Linklater hired the then seven-year-old Ellar Coltrane to play the boy as the centerpiece of the story and continued portraying the role through the film’s 12-year shooting period.

    In addition to being shot over a twelve year period, Boyhood was also written over that same time period, with all four major actors playing a part in the writing process. To this end Linklater notes that the script for certain scenes were sometimes only finished the night prior to shooting.

    A wonderful period piece shot in the present tense. About growing up and parenting, about how we pass through timeThe little dramas of everyday life… This film is a collection of intimate moments —most of them would be cut out of other movies because they don’t advance the plot forward at a quick enough pace." — Richard Linklater

    Being a fan of both Michael Apted’s Up Seriesand Richard Linklater’s work, Boyhood is exactly the type of cinema that I’d always wanted to see made. And the film is every bit as unique and charming as the hype has it. Linklater’s achieved this rare thing of delivering a film that is both intimate and epic at the same time — what a perfect combo.

    Boyhood is packed with wonderfully observed moments, my favourites being pretty much every time Ethan Hawke gets to spend quality time with the kids. Hawke is never better than when he plays highly articulate characters — he’s particularly great at (co-writing and) delivering the sort of philosophical musings on life that Linklater likes to pepper his films with. That said, it’s Patricia Arquette’s character I cared the most about. During the entire movie, all I wanted was for her to be OK. 

    [Seen @ Curzon Soho, London, on Friday 11 July 2014]

    pierreism:

    Orson Welles on Editing

    Christopher Walken, William Shatner, Jeff Goldblum, these thesps of stage and screen are often regarded for their unique and meandering speech patter—but Welles, he will always be on another level, as evidenced by this brief clip from the 1952 documentary Filming Othello, which shows the lumbering, bearded figure at the helm of his Moviola editing suite, and I really can’t tell if he’s talking in paragraphs or just one, long, elongated sentence, such a thing of beauty it is, the unexpected iambic stresses, the bustle and bluster of his words that never seem to settle.

    On the process of editing, he says, "there’s a rhythmic structuring to that, there’s counterpoint, harmony and dissonance." It’s a musicality he knows by tongue.

    (Yes I tried writing this in Wellesian meter; please read accordingly.)

    via Cinephilia and Beyond

    Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]
Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei
Wikipedia:

Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being. 
Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE
[Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]

      Xiao cheng zhi chun (Spring in a Small Town) (1948) by Mu Fei

      Wikipedia:

      Made after the war and the so-called “Solitary Island” period of Shanghai film-making, Spring in a Small Town, unlike its leftist predecessors of the 1930s, was a more intimate affair with only tangential references to the politics of the day. Indeed, the film can be distinguished from those earlier works by its more mature treatment of inter-personal conflicts, particularly in the sense that there are no villains or antagonists except for time and circumstance. Even the husband, who ostensibly stands between Zhou Yuwen and Zhang Zhichen’s love, is an inherently decent and good human being.

      Because of this apparent lack of “political” grounding, Spring in a Small Town was rejected by the Communists as rightist or reactionary, and was ignored following the Communist victory in China in 1949. The film was only able to find its audience and had a resurgence in popularity after the China Film Archive made a new print in the early 1980s. Today it is considered one of the classics of Chinese film. In 2005 the Hong Kong Film Awards Association named it the greatest Chinese film ever made. 

      Available on the BFI Player, which incidentally I had no idea existed until yesterday => HERE

      [Seen @ Curzon Soho, Thursday 26 June 2014]