You can email me
Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.) Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg
I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 
I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 
Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.)

    Jagten (The Hunt) (2012) by Thomas Vinterberg

    I remember blogging about my top films of 2012 and thinking that I was in no position to talk of the best films of the year when I hadn’t even watched The Hunt... Well, I was right — one of the best of that year, for sure. 

    I procrastinated watching it because I knew it’d enrage me (for all the right reasons). I was right about that too… Some scenes made me so mad I wanted to nuke the whole fucking town. 

    Mads Mikkelsen gives a fantastic performance. ( A Royal Affair is another great Danish film he made that same year.)

    Ewan Mcgregor crying over the phone in The Impossible (2012) by J.A. Bayona

    The phone call scene. Best crying performance I’ve seen in film. Unfortunately that youtube clip is cropped way too closely to do it justice — that superb performance by McGregor deserves a bigger build up. (context: pay-as-you-go, running out of credits, had to make every sec of that call count so others could call too… hence the urgency and the breakdown).

    Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.
Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made. 
No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound. 
Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.
The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.
It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation. 
Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.” 
With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

Wiki:

Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism. 
The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.

      Berberian Sound Studio (2012) by Peter Strickland

      In the 1970s, a British sound technician is brought to Italy to work on the sound effects for a gruesome horror film. His nightmarish task slowly takes over his psyche, driving him to confront his own past. Berberian Sound Studio is many things: an anti-horror film, a stylistic tour de force, and a dream of cinema. As such, it offers a kind of pleasure that is rare in films, while recreating in a highly original way the pleasures of Italian horror cinema.

      Anton Bittel for Little White Lies:

      Psychedelic aesthetics, psychogenic fugues - it is the disorientating giallo Lynch might have made.

      No one saw it coming. Defying all predictability, Peter Strickland’s 2009 debut Katalin Varga was an English film telling a Romanian-language rape/revenge story set to eclectic soundscapes by Nurse With Wound.

      Now, just as improbably, his follow-up is a bi-lingual tale of two halves (still with the odd snatch of Nurse With Wound for the sharp-eared) set in the claustrophobic world of audio post-production for a 1970s Italian horror – except that Berberian Sound Studio is itself dressed in the same vividly hallucinatory giallo stylings, with a Lynchian twist.

      The film opens with a reel-to-reel tape player starting up, except that only the sound is sharp, with the impressionistic images taking their time to come into focus. Here, acoustics – and the ambiguities associated with them – will come to the fore, as sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) mixes the ADR, foley work and musical score for a brutal and clearly misogynistic film that we constantly hear but almost never see – even if the garish black-and-red opening credits to this film-within-a-film replace Berberian Sound Studio’s own title sequence.

      It will not be the first time that the boundaries between film and reality are breached – and the ‘Silenzio’ sign that repeatedly flashes red whenever recording is taking place serves as a clear indicator, at least to those familiar with Mulholland Drive, that there will be more to this film than at first meets the eye (and ear). Like the heroines of the Suspiria-like film he is working on, Gilderoy is lost in an environment that he does not fully comprehend. More used to children’s television and local documentaries, he is the archetypically reserved Englishman out of his depth in Italy, with linguistic isolation only adding to his sense of alienation.

      Exploited by his hard-nosed producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco), manipulated by the lecherous director Santini (Antonio Mancino), and treated with officious contempt by the production’s secretary (Tonia Sotiropoulou), Gilderoy soon wearies of having both to listen to and help create endless recordings of female suffering, and is sustained only by his mother’s letters from their home in idyllic Dorking. Yet as the audio from one scene starts bleeding crosstalk into the next, and as the technician’s life and the film on screen begin to merge, what Gilderoy sees, dreams and overlooks all blur into one paranoid nightmare of uneasy complicity. He may want out of the picture, but as Francesco insists, “It is just a film – you are part of it.”

      With all its classic giallo trappings, right down to the unseen projectionist’s black leather gloves, Berberian Sound Studio seems to have an inevitably murderous narrative trajectory, but as its sensory overload never quite gives way to the expected sensationalism, Strickland disorients viewers with a sly meta-horror that reflects upon both the artifice that goes into genre films, and the uncomfortable reality that can underlie their vicious depiction of women.

      Wiki:

      Giallo is an Italian 20th-century genre of literature and film, which in Italian indicates crime fiction and mystery. In the English language it refers to a genre similar to the French fantastique genre and includes elements of horror fiction and eroticism.

      The word “giallo” is Italian for “yellow” and stems from the origin of the genre in Italy as a series of cheap paperback mystery novels which all had trademark yellow covers.

      The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane] The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano
Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.
[Seen on a plane]

        The Intouchables (Intouchables) by  Olivier Nakache & Eric Toledano

        Because the premise of the story is such nauseatingly manipulative sentimental crap, and because the very first line that appears on screen is “based on a true story” [sigh + eyes rolling], I braced myself for the worse and was ready to enjoy hating that film. But alas, I quickly bought into the schmaltz and was won over by it. Mainly because the two leads were excellent and their bromance hard to resist… So Schmaltzy, oh que oui, but still a fine buddy movie.

        [Seen on a plane]

        The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane] The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson
Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams). But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 
[Seen on a plane]

          The Master (2012) by Paul Thomas Anderson

          Gorgeous movie + a haunting music score by Johnny Greenwood + a trio of charismatic actors (Joaquin PhoenixPhilip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams)But even though the relationship between Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) was indeed quite interesting to explore, I found it hard to care about Freddie’s journey. I think that’s because It was pretty clear to me from the get go that Freddie was past help — to quote Peggy Dodd (Amy Adams) — which sadly rendered the entire film’s narrative pointless, in my opinion. 

          [Seen on a plane]

          Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:
Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)
Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 
Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)
Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)
Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways
Nina Hoss in Barbara
Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)
Ann Dowd in Compliance
Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild
Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed
(in no particular order)

            Ten great female characters that made it to the big screen in 2012:

            Golshifteh Farahani in Darbareye Elly (About Elly)

            Emmanuelle Riva in Amour 

            Deannie Yip in Tao Jie (A Simple Life)

            Marion Cotillard in De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone)

            Suzanne Clément in Laurence Anyways

            Nina Hoss in Barbara

            Naomi Watts in Lo Impossible (The Impossible)

            Ann Dowd in Compliance

            Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild

            Mary Elizabeth Winstead in Smashed

            (in no particular order)

            Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables Favourite film of 2012:
Amour by Michael Haneke / France
Close runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Atmen (Breathing) by Karl Markovics — Austria
Darbareye Elly (About Elly) by Asghar Farhadi — Iran [made in 2009 pre-A Separation but released in the UK in 2012]
De rouille et d’os (Rust and Bone) by Jacques Audiard — France
Holy Motors by Leos Carax — France
Michael by Markus Schleinzer — Austria
Stand van de Sterren(Position Among the Stars) by Leonard Retel Helmrich — The Netherlands
The Raid: Redemption by Gareth Evans — Indonesia
Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order): 
Argo (2012) by Ben Affleck / USA
Beasts of the Southern Wild by Benh Zeitlin / USA
Django Unchained by Quentin Tarantino / USA
En kongelig affære (A Royal Affair) by Nikolaj Arcel / Denmark
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part I by Anurag Kashyap / India
Ernest & Célestine  by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner, written by Daniel Pennac / France
Life of Pi by Ang Lee / USA
Tabu by Miguel Gomes / Portugal
Tao jie (A Simple Life) by Ann Hui / Hong Kong
Safety Not Guaranteed by Colin Trevorrow / USA
V/H/S by Adam Wingard, David Bruckner, Ti West, Glenn McQuaid, Joe Swanberg, and the Radio Silence quartet
Zero Dark Thirty by Kathryn Bigelow / USA

Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):
Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables

              Favourite film of 2012:

              Amour by Michael Haneke / France

              Close runners-up (in alphabetical order):

              Distant runners-up (in alphabetical order):

              Other films I’ve really enjoyed (in alphabetical order):

              Barbara / The Cabin in the Woods / Compliance / Dark Horse / Dark Knight Rises / Jeff, Who Lives at Home / Killer Joe / Laurence Anyways / Lincoln / Looper / Nobody Walks / The Queen of Versailles / Rampart / The Sapphires / Sound of My Voice / Stitch / Tiny Furniture / Samsara / Shut Up and Play the hits / Woody Allen: a Documentary / The Intouchables

              Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part III  

                Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

                Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.

                By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

                Stunning faces of Samsara - part III  

                Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

The girls of Samsara 

                  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

                  Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.

                  By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

                  The girls of Samsara 

                  Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part II   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part II   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part II   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part II   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part II   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part II  

                    Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

                    Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.

                    By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

                    Stunning faces of Samsara - part II  

                    Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I   Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.
By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

Stunning faces of Samsara - part I  

                      Samsara (2011) by Ron Fricke

                      Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose previous films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara expands on their effort to portray the connections between humanity and nature in a bold way. Filmed for over four years and in more than twenty countries, the film transports us through multiple cultures to sacred grounds, disaster sites, industrialized zones and natural wonders.

                      By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, the filmmakers subvert our expectations of a documentary. Instead, they encourage our own interpretations inspired by images and musical compositions that infuse the ancient with the modern.

                      Stunning faces of Samsara - part I