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Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto

    Carl Randall"In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)

    Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 

    Carl Randall:

    The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage.

    In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds.

    In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks.

    This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

    Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto

    Pieter by Susanne du Toit
1st Prize @ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London
National Portrait Gallery: 

The portrait is Pieter, du Toit’s eldest son, and was painted in her studio over a number of sittings. He was allowed to find his own pose, on the condition that his hands were prominent. Du Toit says: “I have always found hands essential to communication. I look to the body to provide as much expression as the face.”
The judges felt susanne du Toit demonstrated a beautifully constructed simplicity and directness of approach in this portrait, and agreed unanimously that this should be the overall winner.

His stare and his knuckles are striking

    Pieter by Susanne du Toit

    1st Prize @ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London

    National Portrait Gallery: 

    The portrait is Pieter, du Toit’s eldest son, and was painted in her studio over a number of sittings. He was allowed to find his own pose, on the condition that his hands were prominent. Du Toit says: “I have always found hands essential to communication. I look to the body to provide as much expression as the face.”

    The judges felt susanne du Toit demonstrated a beautifully constructed simplicity and directness of approach in this portrait, and agreed unanimously that this should be the overall winner.

    His stare and his knuckles are striking

    Kholiswa by Lionel Smit, 2013 © Lionel Smit
@ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London
National Portrait Gallery:

The portrait is of a waitress in a township café that Smit visits frequently. He wanted this portrait to capture the essence of her life – including the long distances she travels to work and her struggles as a single mother. Over the course of two months of sittings, smit came to know her better and gained insights into her life.

Some more Lionel Smit => HERE

    Kholiswa by Lionel Smit, 2013 © Lionel Smit

    BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London

    National Portrait Gallery:

    The portrait is of a waitress in a township café that Smit visits frequently. He wanted this portrait to capture the essence of her life – including the long distances she travels to work and her struggles as a single mother. Over the course of two months of sittings, smit came to know her better and gained insights into her life.

    Some more Lionel Smit => HERE

    Self-portrait, Ian Cumberland
@ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London
Cumberland is back on the BP Portrait Award’s shortlist — and on a rather large scale, this time. He never fails to impress me and this portrait is hands down my favourite of this year’s batch.
[Check out Ian Cumberland’s portraits selected in previous years => HERE] Self-portrait, Ian Cumberland
@ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London
Cumberland is back on the BP Portrait Award’s shortlist — and on a rather large scale, this time. He never fails to impress me and this portrait is hands down my favourite of this year’s batch.
[Check out Ian Cumberland’s portraits selected in previous years => HERE]

      Self-portrait, Ian Cumberland

      @ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London

      Cumberland is back on the BP Portrait Award’s shortlist — and on a rather large scale, this time. He never fails to impress me and this portrait is hands down my favourite of this year’s batch.

      [Check out Ian Cumberland’s portraits selected in previous years => HERE]

      George Bellows, Dempsey and Firpo (1924) / Dempsey through the ropes:

via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!


[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]
George Bellows, Dempsey and Firpo (1924) / Dempsey through the ropes:

via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!


[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]

        George Bellows, Dempsey and Firpo (1924) / Dempsey through the ropes:

        via Self Hating Hipster:

        The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).

        At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!

        [Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]
        George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 


George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013
I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 
Self Hating Hipster:

Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

George Bellows on boxing:

I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.
[…]
I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:
Dempsey and Firpo (1924):
via Self Hating Hipster:

The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).
At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!
[Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]


The White Hope (1921):

This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.
Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 

          George Bellows exhibit @ Royal Academy of Arts, London, 28 March 2013

          I was knocked out by George Bellows’s “Stag at Sharkey’s” when I came across that painting on the web a few months ago (ref to my original blog post => HERE), so I it was rather exciting to be given the chance to see it “in the flesh” @ the Royal Academy. And I wasn’t disappointed: all of his boxing fights paintings and lithographs on display are mesmerising — I love Bellows’s gritty realism… I’m less keen when he tries to rub brush strokes with the New York upper class (a couple of of rooms in the exhibition made me cringe). 

          Self Hating Hipster:

          Bellows rubbed elbows with artists like John Sloan, Everett Shinn, George Luks and Reginald Marsh; this group of artists were referred to collectively as the Ashcan Painters because of the crude, unbridled depiction of urbanity in both its glory and filth. Instead of a lush, pastoral landscape or an impressionistic portrait of a woman with a parasol, these artists were painting hold-ups, kids bathing in the Hudson, burlesque shows, train tracks, dive bars, circuses, Coney Island…and boxing matches.

          George Bellows on boxing:

          I am not interested in the morality of prize fighting but let me say that the atmosphere around the fighters is a lot more immoral than the fighters themselves.

          […]

          I don’t know anything about boxing. I am just painting two men trying to kill each other.

          Interesting bits about a few of the boxing paintings:

          Dempsey and Firpo (1924):

          via Self Hating Hipster:

          The painting is a snapshot of a title fight between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. Luis Firpo, a promising world-class heavyweight, challenged the then champion, Jack Dempsey and the bout was booked for September 14th, 1923 at the Polo Grounds in NY. As the story goes, Firpo dropped Dempsey in the beginning of first round; Dempsey got back to his feet and knocked Firpo down seven times (predating the 3KO limit per round and the rule prohibiting you from downing a half-downed opponent…Jesus).

          At the very end of the first round, Firpo backed Dempsey up against the ropes and rocked Dempsey’s chin sending him through the ropes and out onto the press table. Hell of a first round!

          [Bellows based his oil on a lithograph titled “Dempsey Through the Ropes” from the year prior which now goes for north of $100,000 at auction. This image has been facsimiled by the likes of the U.S. Armed Forces and The Simpsons.]

          The White Hope (1921):

          This litho recalls an event of 11 years earlier: the heavyweight title fight held in Reno, Nevada, on 4 jul 1910, in which the legendary African champion Jack Johnson decisevely defeated the former champion Jim Jeffries.

          Before the fight, promoters exploited racist attitudes by touting Jeffries as “the great white hope”. 

          Preliminaries (to the big out) (1916):

          Boxing had been made legal by 1916 but this Madison Square Garden fight is the first ever attended by women. 

          "Christina’s World" by Andrew Wyeth @ MoMA, NYC

          The woman crawling through the tawny grass was the artist’s neighbor in Maine, who, crippled by polio, “was limited physically but by no means spiritually.” Wyeth further explained, “The challenge to me was to do justice to her extraordinary conquest of a life which most people would consider hopeless.” He recorded the arid landscape, rural house, and shacks with great detail, painting minute blades of grass, individual strands of hair, and nuances of light and shadow. In this style of painting, known as magic realism, everyday scenes are imbued with poetic mystery.

          I always manage a quick visit to the MoMA whenever I’m in New York, although I must confess that over the past few years I’ve seen more of the museum’s bar than its galleries. But this time around I forced myself to avoid the bar and I stuck the art.

          "Christina’s World" is displayed in a corridor near the escalators and it pretty much stops you in your track as you make your way from one special exhibit to another. I wasn’t the only passer by who fell under the spell of the crawling woman: quite a few of us lingered around that painting a little too long. 

          [And to answer Ray72’s usual question every time we come out of an art show, “Christina’s World” would be the painting I’d take away with me and risk going to jail for.]

          One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.
One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.
(That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)
It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 
For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 
Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.
……………………………………………………………
NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.

            One of Colin Davidson’s portraits of Irish poet Michael Longley is on the BP Portrait Award 2012's shortlist, currently on display @ the National Portrait Gallery, London.

            (That portrait is in my opinion definitely one of the best of this year’s crop.)

            It’s only when browsing Longley’s website that I realised that he was behind that striking painting of Glen Hansard, used as the album cover of Hansard’s latest record, Rhythm and Repose (recent blog post => HERE)… I must have two left eyes for not having made that connection earlier — Davidson’s style of portraiture is quite distinctive. 

            For me, his portraits of Ciarán Hinds really stand out but it’s probably because Hinds is a perfect subject for portraiture, what with his permanent brooding/moody air. 

            Sidenote: Glen Hansard is the odd one out here: he’s from Dublin. Davidson, Longley and Hinds are from Belfast.

            ……………………………………………………………

            NPG’s blurb on “The dialects of silence (portrait of Michael Longley)”:

            The portrait is of Irish poet Michael Longley and was made from life. Longley met the artist at the launch of the new Lyric Theatre, Belfast, where the foyer’s walls are hung with portraits by Davidson. Davidson says he attempts to “capture the monent when the sitter is lost in their own thoughts”.

            “Richie Culver” by Alan Coulson

            Third Prize of the BP Portrait Award 2012 exhibition @ National Portrait Gallery, London.

            NPG’s blurb:

            The portrait is of Richie Culver, a fellow artist and friend. Coulson visited Culver at his home and produced preparatory sketches before completing the painting in his studio. He says “my aim was the produce a direct and honest painting that would capture Richie’s unique appearance alongside his easygoing nature.

            The judges felt that in this bold figure, the artist very succesfully employed finely controlled paint colour and lighting. The ondulation of tone and attention to detail successfully brought the style and subject together.

            Great to see Coulson back this year with yet another striking portrait. I really like his style and I vividly remember his “Latoya”, one of my personal favourites from last year's shortlist.

            “El abuelo (Agustín Estudillo)” by Ignacio Estudillo

            Second Prize of the BP Portrait Award 2012 exhibition @ National Portrait Gallery, London.

            NPG’s blurb:

            The portrait is of Ignacio’s paternal grandfather. He says “It’s not a purely analytical portrait of my grandfaher, but a way of showing part of the human condition to which he belongs. I’m not only creating a portrait of my grandfather but also revealing a part of myself.”

            The judges felt that the large scale of this dramatic portrait of a single elderly figure in a dark room was intensely atmospheric, thoughtful and focused.