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Mother #1 by Yunsung Jang, 2013 (© Yunsung Jang)
One of the two was shortlisted for The PB Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

The portrait is of the artist’s mother. Yunsung Jang says he wanted to record not justher physical likeness, but the depth of their relationship, including ‘The complexities of devotion, pity, guilt, and gratefulness that a son feels toward his mother.’
Mother #1 by Yunsung Jang, 2013 (© Yunsung Jang)
One of the two was shortlisted for The PB Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

The portrait is of the artist’s mother. Yunsung Jang says he wanted to record not justher physical likeness, but the depth of their relationship, including ‘The complexities of devotion, pity, guilt, and gratefulness that a son feels toward his mother.’

    Mother #1 by Yunsung Jang, 2013 
    (© Yunsung Jang)

    One of the two was shortlisted for The PB Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

    The portrait is of the artist’s mother. Yunsung Jang says he wanted to record not justher physical likeness, but the depth of their relationship, including ‘The complexities of devotion, pity, guilt, and gratefulness that a son feels toward his mother.’

    Fergus by Paul Benney, 2014
    (© Paul Benney)

    From the BP Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

    The portrait is of the chef Fergus Henderson, one of the founders of St. John restaurant, Smithfield. Henderson is known for his concept of ‘nose to tail eating’ and has recently won a Lifetime Achievement Award from the World’s 50 Best Restaurants Academy.

    Could it be the very same pig I was served when I ate there? 

    Portrait of Jean Yves, a man looking like Vincent Van Gogh by Gauthier Hubert(© Gauthier Hubert)
From the BP Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

Gauthier Hubert trained at the École nationale supérieure des Arts visuels (ENSAV) La Cambre, Brussels. His work has been seen in group exhibitions in Belgium, France and Iceland and in solo exhibitions in Antwerp, Ghent and Brussels.
The portrait is of Jean Yves, a man the artist had met on a number of occasions, and decided to paint as he reminded him of Vincent Van Gogh. He used some of the colours found in Van Gogh’s paintings to emphasise the visual link between the two.

In the flesh, that blue is insane. Stare at it too long and you’ll go blind.

    Portrait of Jean Yves, a man looking like Vincent Van Gogh by Gauthier Hubert
    (© Gauthier Hubert)

    From the BP Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

    Gauthier Hubert trained at the École nationale supérieure des Arts visuels (ENSAV) La Cambre, Brussels. His work has been seen in group exhibitions in Belgium, France and Iceland and in solo exhibitions in Antwerp, Ghent and Brussels.

    The portrait is of Jean Yves, a man the artist had met on a number of occasions, and decided to paint as he reminded him of Vincent Van Gogh. He used some of the colours found in Van Gogh’s paintings to emphasise the visual link between the two.

    In the flesh, that blue is insane. Stare at it too long and you’ll go blind.

    Man with a Plaid Blanket by Thomas Ganter (© Thomas Ganter)

    First Prize Winner of the BP Portrait Award 2014 @ NPG

    The portrait is of Karel, who lives on the streets in Ganter’s neighborhood. Ganter asked Karel to help recreate a moment when the artist had noticed the similarities of clothing and pose between the subjects of old master paintings and individuals wrapped in blankets living on the streets.

    Ganter says: “By portraying a homeless man in a way only nobility or saints used to be portrayed, I tried to emphasize that everyone deserves respectful treatment, attention, and care.”

    All the judges were struck by the intensity of the sitter’s gaze and how every texture and surface is rendered in intricate detail, from the icon-like gold chain fence to the rose in the crumpled paper cup.

    The First Prize winning portrait is rarely the one that stands out for me, but this year, man oh man, do we have a clear winner. Hands down. Ganter’s portrait is sucking all the colours from the room. I couldn’t keep my eyes off the gold background, Karel’s face, the blanket, the gold, the face, the blanket, the gold, the face, the blanket, the gold, the face…

    Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.
Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess? Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.
Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess? Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.
Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess? Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.
Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess? Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.
Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess? Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.
Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess?

      Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs @ Tate Modern, London

      In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium. From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

      Joyful and magical exhibition, me thinks. I urge you to go. But brace yourself for an explosion of colours… Maybe even wear sunglasses? You’ll look like an obnoxious ass but that might very well be the smart choice to make, if you ask me.

      Sidenote: If you own little people and want to introduce them to fine art without scarring them for life, that’s definitely the exhibition for you — they’re going to love it (or at least, not be bored out of their minds by it). I remember when I was little and my mother decided that it was time for my sister and me to see some art stuff. She woke up one morning in a panic, grabbed us by the hand, dragged us to the Louvres and, while we were firmly in her grip (handcuffs might have been involved), she made us run through every single fucking room of the museum, having us repeat the same motions over and over again: look right look left look up (the ceiling, where the naked cherubs live), next room, look right look left look up, next room, look right look left look up, and so on and so forth… We did that for two consecutive days (oh my god, Le Louvres is fucking gigantic). And yet, we still managed to miss both the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. Oh mum, Oh sweet clueless mum, thanks for trying, I guess?

      Magda Cordell, Figure (Woman) 1956-7 @ Tate Modern, London

      Tate Modern:

      With its highly textured surface and sack-like body, Cordell’s Figure (Woman) shows an affinity with the expressive abstraction of European artists such as Jean Dubuffet and Jean Fautrier. Her depiction of the female figure was seen by contemporary critics as a break with traditional representations of women, embodying the anxieties of a nuclear age. More recently, her paintings have been seen as images of heroic femininity with the distortions signifying the resilience of the human body against injury and change.

      More Tate musings on Cordell => HERE 

      Bloody magnificent, innit?

      Wassily Kandinsky, Swinging,1925

      This one hangs at Tate Modern, London. The museum runs some sort of caption contest on selected pieces, highlighted as “the big picture”. I really like one of the captions picked for Kandinsky’s Swinging:

      “Splendid spume sycophantic sergeant. Trending turbulence towards terrific tsunami. Ultimate ululation uxorious upward utopian. Virulent vain vein vexing vulgarities.” – Marc Roberts

      #AlliterationWorkout

      Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto Carl Randall, "In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)
Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 
Carl Randall:

The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage. 
In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds. 
In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks. 
This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto

        Carl Randall"In the Footsteps of Hiroshige: Portraits of Modern Japan" @ National Portrait Gallery, London (until 15 Sep 2013)

        Carl Randall won last year’s BP Portrait Travel Award with a really striking painting called “Mr Kitazawa’s Noodle Bar” => HERE. He was given £5,000 to go explore & paint Japan. Above are a few of the portraits that came out out that journey. 

        Carl Randall:

        The japanese woodblock-print artist Ando Hiroshige (1797-1858) made prints depicting the places and people of his day. In 1832, he travelled along the Tokaido highway, a trading route from Tokyo to Kyoto, producing depictions of the people he met and the landscapes he experienced. Those prints now serve as a valuable document of life in japan at that time, forming an important part of the country’s cultural heritage.

        In june 2012, I travelled the same route to make modern portraits of people and their environments: a cross-section of old and mew japan, from salary men in office blocks to farmers in rice fields. The journey started in Tokyo where, drawn to its densely crowded streets, I painted hundreds of residents, directly from life. These depictions of strangers in crowded public spaces are related to my interest in urban alienation — people sharing physical space, but mentally existing in separate worlds.

        In cities such as Yokohama and nagoya, I painted other features of modern japan including sushi restaurants and department stores. As the highway moves out of cities and into rural areas, elderly rice farmers work their fields, their backs permanently bowed, skin leathery and wrinkled from a lifetime of farming. I also saw aspects of traditional japanese scenes: hot springs, fireflies and red autumn leaves. However, the modern and urban were ever present in the rural, with old and new often sitting side by side, such as bullet trains, motorways, telegraph poles and tower blocks.

        This unique and exciting opportunity allowed me to develop my interest in portraiture and japan, while following in the footstep of a great artist.

        Sushi + Shibuya + Aka-fujii + The rice farmer’s daughters + Onsen + Rainy season + Kyoto + Sumo + Tetrapods + Zen garden, Kyoto

        Pieter by Susanne du Toit
1st Prize @ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London
National Portrait Gallery: 

The portrait is Pieter, du Toit’s eldest son, and was painted in her studio over a number of sittings. He was allowed to find his own pose, on the condition that his hands were prominent. Du Toit says: “I have always found hands essential to communication. I look to the body to provide as much expression as the face.”
The judges felt susanne du Toit demonstrated a beautifully constructed simplicity and directness of approach in this portrait, and agreed unanimously that this should be the overall winner.

His stare and his knuckles are striking

        Pieter by Susanne du Toit

        1st Prize @ BP Portrait Award 2013, National Portrait Gallery, London

        National Portrait Gallery: 

        The portrait is Pieter, du Toit’s eldest son, and was painted in her studio over a number of sittings. He was allowed to find his own pose, on the condition that his hands were prominent. Du Toit says: “I have always found hands essential to communication. I look to the body to provide as much expression as the face.”

        The judges felt susanne du Toit demonstrated a beautifully constructed simplicity and directness of approach in this portrait, and agreed unanimously that this should be the overall winner.

        His stare and his knuckles are striking